When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Tombstone Tuesday~Fallen, Cracked & Worn

   A visit to McElveen Cemetery in Williamsburg County,SC, in search of my Smith family, resulted in discovering the unfortunate state of the  headstone of my third Great Grandmother, Martha Julia Epps Smith (1808-1954).


Grave of Martha Julia Epps Smith
McElveen Cemetery, Williamsburg,SC
©Cheri Hudson Passey

 The headstone is laying on the ground and is cracked and worn.


Headstone of Martha Julia Epps Smith
McElveen Cemetery, Williamsburg,SC
©Cheri Hudson Passey


                                               Although hard to read, the inscription says:
                                            
                                                                                             Mrs. Martha Smith
                                                                                              consort of H.J. Smith
                                                                                              who departed this life
                                                       13 July 1854 aged 46 years, 6 months, 11 days



    Martha was a wife, daughter, sister and mother of 13. Sad to see her headstone, the last tribute to her life in such a bad state.
  Can it or should it be repaired? That is a question mulling around in my mind. 
 There are many descendants of Martha and her husband Henry J. Smith (1807-1849). Perhaps we can come together and find an answer.


Are we kin? If so, please contact me! Together we can find our people!


8 comments:

  1. Cheri, I'm glad you were able to find and photograph the headstone while it is still visible. I wonder if a stone that is so badly broken can be saved. On another note, I wonder why she is called a consort? Were they common law married or was there a ceremony? Or does it mean something else?

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    1. Hi Wendy! A Consort in those days was one whose spouse was still living. Not sue if there is something that can be done about the stone. I always hate to see them like that! Thanks so much for reading my post! Sure appreciate you leaving a comment too!

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  2. It's so sad that the stone is in such bad shape. But, it's wonderful that you were able to find and photograph it.

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    1. It is sad. Wish I could do something about it! Thanks for reading and commenting, Jana! I really appreciate it!

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  3. The stone is repairable, and it's not beyond the skill of average people. I attended a seminar by this person http://www.linkedin.com/in/jasonharpe last year in Belton SC to learn how to do it. You might want to contact him and see if there is a seminar coming up that you can attend and pick up the skills and a material list to do the job right.
    Jim Poole

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    1. Jim, thanks so much for the information!

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  4. Does anyone maintain the cemetery? I have lots of ancestors buried there and would certainly like to help however I can in preserving it - Wilson McElveen

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    1. It looks as if someone has. I will follow up and let you know. Thanks, Wilson!

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