When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
Another cousin connection! Wow! This time I may have information that can knock down a brick wall. I've said it before and I'll say it again. If you don't have your family tree online where others can see it you are missing an important source of information. Sharing your family and their stories online through a blog, a tree or personal website enables other family members to locate you. This may be the cousin who has the family Bible ,letters or photos. They may have the one document you need to progress up your tree! If you haven't begun to share with others online, I encourage you to begin today. Decide the best way for you and get your family out there! If  you do, you will connect with cousins!


                                                                                     
                                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Saturday, October 14, 2017

Sibling Saturday~Boys Will Be Boys!

George and Hattie Roberts Family
About 1907
Back Row -L to R:
   Lillie (Roberts) Hooper (1885-1930)
  Thomas Able Roberts (1887-1961)
  Hattie Roberts (1888-1972)
  George Washington Roberts (1890-1971)
Front Row-L to R:
  William Treadford Roberts (1894-1959)-my great grandfather
  Verdy Gil Roberts (1898-1976)
 Hattie (Brazell) Roberts with Lyda Roberts (1906-1981) 
 George Philip Roberts with Andrew Clifton Roberts (1905-1971) 
Walter Crawford Roberts (1896-1983)

Genealogy is so much more than collecting names, dates and places. It's the stories that help our families come to life. A few years ago, I was fortunate to connect with a distant cousin who shared the following story about the sons of  both my maternal great great grandfather George Phillip Roberts(1856-1930) and his brother Thomas Jefferson Roberts (1866-1955).
"George Phillip's sons as well as Thomas Jefferson Robert's sons among others had happily nicknamed themselves the " Twelve Raggedy-Ass Boys" This was more of a club than what we would think of now as a modern street gang: however, the boys did get into trouble...from time to time. Like the time they set fire to a neighbors outhouse ( in those days the boys referred to it as a "crapper"). the neighbor saw them do it and chased them down, but they ran into Thomas Jefferson Robert's store and hid there. When the neighbor came into the store to confront Thomas Jefferson Roberts, the boys acted like little angels and convinced Thomas Jefferson that they did nothing wrong. Thomas then "escorted" the the irate neighbor out of his store. Thomas Jefferson's store was built on a small hill and the back half of it was on stilts. The boys would often meet underneath the store and it was there that my grandfather, Charles Franklin Roberts and his brother Walter Roberts were playing butcher. they had gotten a hold of one of Thomas Jefferson Robert's meat cleavers from the store and were using a stump to cut up branches, toys and whatever else they could find. Then Charles noticed something that looked better to "butcher" when Walter had his hand resting on the stump. With one swift whack, Charles lopped off one of Walter's fingers. How the boys explained that one I'll never know !"
 ~Cody Dailey. Robert's researcher.

Four of the Roberts Brothers
Verdy,Walter,William and George
© Cheri Hudson Passey

What rascals! It's fun to think of the grandfather my mother knew and loved as part of the "Raggedy-Ass"boys. I wish he had lived long enough for me to ask him about their adventures. 

What about the siblings in your tree? Do you have any stories about their exploits? I'd love to hear about them!

Thanks for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, October 8, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar


October 8-October 14




Oct. 11~
 My paternal great great grandfather, Ezra Ashby Hudson (1821-1882) was born 196 years ago in Darlington District, South Carolina. He was the son of Jacob Hudson (1788-1870) and Mary (?).


Oct. 13~
  The 105th wedding anniversary of my maternal great grandparents, Manning David Daughrity, Jr. (1889-1931) and Loretta (McManus) Daughrity (1834-1936). David was 23 and Etta 17 when they married in Bishopville, Lee, South Carolina. 

David and Etta Daughrity
Marriage License 
   
 My 5th great grandmother, Mary (Strother) Dargan (1772-1822) died 195 years ago in Sumter District, South Carolina. 

Who's on your calendar this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Celebration Sunday~~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
Being able to recover my files after my laptop died! Whew! I am so glad to have put all my data and files on Dropbox. After having to leave my computer at the repair shop for who knows how many days,  I pulled up Dropbox on an old, very slow laptop that is not being used and voila! I can still use my Legacy computer program, my picture and Word files and work on my powerpoint presentation for a lecture I am giving in a few weeks. Should my laptop not be fixable, and I sure hope it is, everything on it is also backed up with Backblaze, so I can download it all to a new computer if I have too. Do you have all your important files backed up to the cloud? If not, I encourage you to do it. Right now. You will thank me later!


                                                                                     
                                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Thursday, October 5, 2017

The RootsTech 2018 Schedule is Out! Time to Start Planning Classes!


Registered for RootsTech 2018 or thinking about it?
The schedule of sessions is now online.
Take a look and get started planning your days!
Click here to see what's being offered this year.
Deciding on which classes to take at RootsTech can be overwhelming. My suggestion? Take a step back from the schedule and answer some questions of yourself to help narrow down your choices.

Using Identity Characteristics to Locate Your Ancestors
Angela Paker McGhie
RootsTech 2017

First-What is your level of experience? Are you a beginning genealogist or have you been researching for years?

Second-Are there topics you need to understand better or are new to you? What do you need to help you become a better genealogist?

Third-Who do you want to hear speak? We all have our favorite speakers. Is there someone you don't want to miss? We all have people we want to learn from no matter what their presentation is about.

Fourth-Do you like to learn by doing? RootsTech offers several labs to help put the instruction into practice.

Fifth-Remember to have fun! Each class can offer you something. We never know everything and even a professional can learn from a beginner class. Think out of the box and attend a class for the fun of it!

Once you have your schedule filled out it's not set in stone. You may change your mind at the last minute and decide to attend another when you get there. Listen to what others are saying and suggesting. A class or lecturer may be recommended by another attendee you had not considered.
The RootsTech app should be out soon making it easier to create your schedule to consult each day. That announcement will be shared on my blog with instructions on how to download and use it.

Learning about WWI and WWII Records
David Allen Lambert



Take a look at the many sessions being offered at RootsTech 2018. What classes are you excited about?

Thanks for stopping by,
Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, October 3, 2017

"Researching in School Records" an In-Brief With IDG Guide by Melissa Barker~Review

A new In-Brief with IDG Guide from the In-Depth Genealogist is available. The following in my review of this new product.




In her In-Brief with IDG Guide “Researching in School Records,” Melissa Barker shares important information on why, how and where to begin looking for your ancestors in these records.
Melissa begins by listing the types of schools that may have been available in the areas we are researching. Knowing about the community our ancestors lived in may help to point us to possible educational opportunities in the area, leading us to locate the various types of records possibly created.
Types of records can include special school censuses, enrollment and attendance records. Melissa explains what information often in the various types.
Other ideas on where to find school information include yearbooks and newspapers.
She cautions not to overlook Yearbooks and school photographs and explains where we may find them.
What if your ancestors didn’t attend school? Melissa also addresses this issue in the guide. She shares resources you may not have thought of that may mention them even if they weren’t a student.
After explaining the why, how and what the records that may exist, Melissa supplies a comprehensive list of links to sites with searchable school records, state archives, religious holdings, and articles on the topic of using school records for research.
When we are researching our ancestors, we should look beyond the typical birth, marriage and death records to see what else may help us to understand their lives. Looking for school records and the information they may provide is a step not to miss.
 Melissa Barker’s In-Brief with IDG Guide “Researching in School Records” gives the necessary information to begin using this important resource.

Disclaimer: A free copy of the In-Brief Guide “Researching in School Records” was provided for purposes of reviewing.
I am also an affiliate with the In-Depth Genealogist.

Have you used school records in your research?
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Monday, October 2, 2017

Mailbox Monday~Dear Old "Pete" and Frances

                                                           
Etta Daughrity Letter
Envelope
                 
This letter was written in 1934 by my great-grandmother, Loretta "Etta" (McManus) Daughrity  (1894-1936) to her daughters Loretta Geraldine (Daughrity) Dennis (1919-1959)  who was a few months from her 16th birthday and Frances Elizabeth (Daughrity) Hicks (1916-1989), aged 18.
 In this letter, Loretta is lovingly called by her nickname "Pete."
The girls were visiting friends and family in Camden, South Carolina. 

The letter is transcribed as written with no spelling or punctuation corrections.


                                                                                    Wed. Aug. 8, 34
Dear old "pete" and Francis, 

         Pete your card came to hand
Tues. was sure glad to hear from 
you all, and to know you were 
well, and having a fine time,
We are all about the same,
and every thing is the same
old thing nothing new, going
on, only Mrs. Cole took (9) nine
kids out to Pocallo Tues. p.m. for
an after-noon swim. Azile and 
"Rene" were in the crowd, she sure
had a brave heart to take so 
many. of course Annie Mae went
along with J.W. and Frankie.
If you all are coming home Sun.
and they will spend the day, drop
me a card, so I will know Sat.
Etta Daughrity Letter
pg. 1

what are you doing Sat? having
a good time I hope. But mind
what you are doing, and be a 
good girl, the two or you, not
only one. Oh! yes, Billy came Tues.
and stayed a long time, you
were not home Ha! Ha! He
passed here a little while ago.
Oh! Boy, don't you wish you were
here? Know you do in a way.
We had a good rain Tues. p.m.
and again today, it is nice
and cool, down here now.
You must come down to see me
some time. What is Allie doing?
hope she is feeling fine, she must be
to have you all up there to cook for.
Ha! Ha! Tell her to hurry up and run
you home, how is Earle, Jeff, Mack,
and Evelynn? Guess they are all fine. 
Well I'll close with love to all, tell
them to come see us, and write some
time. You wouldn't write pat. that's ok.
          Mother


Etta Daughrity
pg. 2
Two of those mentioned in the letter,  Charles Earl McManus (1903-1973) a cousin to the girls and his wife Allie Sumeral McManus (1889-1968), were living in Camden in the 1930 and 1940 census. Although not living on Lyttleton St. in these records, they were living nearby and were renting different homes in each. They may have been at the Lyttleton address in 1934.
Others mentioned are:
Mack, a Dunlap cousin whose wife went by the name "Jeff" and were living in Camden. 
Azile, joining with the group swimming is my maternal grandmother Azile Juanita (Daughrity) Roberts Sullivan (1921-2009).
Billy, the boy their mom was teasing about not seeing may have been William Austin Hicks (1912-1994) who Francis married in 1936. Although, daughter Charlene does not remember her father ever being called "Billy." The name at the end of the letter may be "Pet" and not Pat as it looks. Willie Etta Dunlap (1877-1960) was kin to the family and lived with Etta and helped take care of her girls.
Connections to the other names have not been made yet.

My favorite part of this letter is Etta's  use of "Ha!Ha!" when describing an event to her girls. It gives me a hint of her personality. 
Letters from the past can be a boon of information. Clues to names and details about activities can add flesh to the bones of an ancestor and family. 

Do you have letters written by an ancestor? What did you learn from them?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Sunday, October 1, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

October 1-October 7




October 2~
Frances "Fannie" Virginia (McRady) McManus (1856-1903), my maternal great great grandmother, was born 161 years ago. She was born in Sumter County, South Carolina. She was the daughter of Thomas J. McRady (1821-1896) and Mary Jane (Brown) McRady (1821-1894).


Fannie McManus
Headstone
Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery
Pisgah Crossroads, Sumter, South Carolina
©Cheri Hudson Passey
Oct. 6~
   The 77th anniversary of the wedding of my maternal Grandparents Gilbert Ernest Roberts, Sr. (1920-1944) and Azile Juanita Daughrity (1921-2009).  Gilbert was 20 and Azile 18 when they married in Lancaster, South Carolina in 1940.


Azile and Gilbert
About 1940
©Cheri Hudson Passey
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
Another cousin connection, this time through a Find a Grave memorial site I created for my 3rd great grandmother Martha (Mathis) Dorrity. Because my name is on on the page, he was able to click on my information and send me a message. We have a connection through her husband a generation before. This is another example of why we need to share our ancestor's information anywhere we can.  We never know who may see and can add to our knowledge about them. Dancing that dance! Were you?


                                                                                     
                                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Tuesday's Tip~Gettin' By With Help from Our Friends~Eileen Souza


Today's tips come from Eileen A. Souza owner of  Old Bones Genealogy.

10 Tips for More Accurate Research

Genealogy is not something that can be done from start to finish in a weekend or even a year of weekends. It is, however, an enjoyable activity that is done by millions of people. While you enjoy doing your family research, I am sure you would like your family tree to be as accurate as possible. Here are 10 tips to avoid genealogy’s most common mistakes:
1. Talk to your family. You relatives know more about your family than the Internet. Write down what they know. More information acquired before hitting the Internet increases your chances of making good selections about what you add to your tree. And while you are doing that, you are helping to preserve their knowledge.

2. Use caution in your research. Genealogy records found online or elsewhere that are not original documents may have errors. Abstracting or transcribing old documents can introduce typos and other transcription errors. In the case of abstracting, there may be other important information on the original. Knowing whether family history books are accurate without proper citations (as footnotes or endnotes), can be difficult. It is important to try to use the original documents, if available.
3. Unless you have a very rare surname with a unique spelling, you will need to do more research to determine if you are actually related to another person with the same name.

4. While not impossible, it is unlikely that you are related to a Royal family since they tended to be inbred.

5. Another popular myth has immigrants’ names being changed at Ellis Island (or earlier officials). Your ancestor may have had their name slaughtered at the port of departure where the passenger list was created or they may have decided to become Americans by changing their name themselves, but it was not changed by officials at the port of entry.

6. Spelling was standardized in the US and UK during the 19th and 20th centuries. Yet today British English and American English still have dissimilar spelling standardization. Do not assume because it is not spelled the way you know it that it is not your line. Confirm a fact/relationship using more than just a name.

7. While sometimes you must guess, either keep your guesses in a separate tree and only move the fact into your real tree when it is no longer a guess or note that the fact is a guess. Otherwise, no one will have confidence in your research.

8. Everyone can make mistakes. Periodically check your data for these common errors: parents born before their children, people living more than 125 years and a child linked to more than one set of parents. Fix all the mistakes that you find as soon as you discover them. You want to avoid inadvertently tracing entire lines of people that have no relationship to you.

9. When using other people’s family tree data, it is safest to treat it as a clue and do further research. Even the best research may change if new data surfaces since the original data was uncovered.

10. Lastly, there is a principle in genealogy research known as a “reasonably exhaustive search”. This means that you must keep searching for all documents that may apply to the facts you are researching. All documents are not online. While new records are added frequently, if not daily, online records are still the tip of the iceberg. You need to extend your research to libraries, societies, archives and other repositories to ensure valid results.

Thanks for sharing your tips, Eileen! 


Bio



Eileen Souza, PLCGS, owner of Old Bones Genealogy, is a professional genealogist who specializes in Maryland research. She is president of the Carroll County Genealogical Society, a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, the Maryland Genealogical Society and other local business and genealogical societies.
Eileen is a graduate of the National Institute of Genealogical Studies, earning a Professional Learning Certificate in Genealogical Studies; a graduate of the National Institute of Genealogical Research; and a graduate of the 18-month ProGen Study Group (for the book Professional Genealogy edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills).  
She is the author of Research in Carroll County, published in the August 2012 issue of the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal. Her presentations include “Getting Started with your Genealogy,” “Dig Up Your Ancestors Online,” “Finding Beaver Dam Levell” and “The ABCs of DNA for Genealogy.” 

What suggestions do you have to be more accurate with your genealogy research?
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, September 24, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.



My Happy Dance This Week:  
This week I had the opportunity to meet with some local genealogists and spend an hour and a half talking about genealogy! We shared our frustrations, suggested solutions and talked about amazing finds. What really had me dancing was when one of the ladies presented us with a handout she brought for each of us. She wanted us to have a copy since she felt it was an important resource. It turned out to be one I had given out during a presentation to the local genealogy club! It was a list of links to various newspaper research sites. Funny and encouraging at the same time. Maybe I am doing OK at presenting information people can use!  What had you dancing this week?


                                                                                     
                                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Thursday, September 21, 2017

Treasure Chest Thursday~Mattie's New Testament


Old Testament owned by Mattie Baker

One of the pleasures of seeking out ancestors is finding items they once held dear. Items that then become a treasure to you.
This New Testament was owned by my paternal great -great grandmother, Martha "Mattie" Victoria (Bradford) Baker (1862-1947).
It was discovered by my father in a box of items going to the trashcan after Mattie's daughter, my great aunt Kathryn Louise (Baker) Ryan passed away (1898-1987).

While Mattie used this book for worship, she also used it to keep things to save and remember. 

She signed her name, the date, and her location


Inside Cover

Included newspaper clippings

Poem about America


Pressed flowers                                               
Violet from a friend.


Flower picked at music teacher's house





Inserted obituaries

Obituaries of son George and sister- in- law Mary


Saved a Valentine from her granddaughter Ellen  


Front of Valentine
                          
                                       
                                                 

and the wedding announcement of grandaughter Lola.


Mattie dedicated her New Testament on the last page to her sister Esther who died in 1919. 


Family or personal Bibles are sought out for any information they may contain on vital statistics. They often are the only place where birth, marriage, and deaths are recorded. If you come across one belonging to your ancestor, don't make the mistake of only looking at the family register. Turn each page to uncover any hidden keepsakes. You never know what you may find.

What have you found in a family or personal book of scripture?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,




Sunday, September 17, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.



My Happy Dance This Week:  
First,  more than a happy dance, I am grateful for the safety of friends and family during Hurricane Irma this week. Several had damage to property but all came through unharmed. 
The second was the release of the long-awaited video of LeVar Burton's keynote address at RootsTech in February.  If you haven't seen it, I encourage you to take the time to do so.
It is inspiring.  You can watch it straight from the post I wrote about it by clicking on here.
So, how was your week? 


                                                                                     
                                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Saturday, September 16, 2017

Get Out Your Tissues and Get Comfortable. The Video We Have Been Waiting for Is Finally Here!


Listening to Levar Burton at RootsTech 2017



RootsTech 2017 was such a fun experience for me.
I learned during classes, met and made new friends, enjoyed parties and special events. The keynote speakers were inspiring.
Many of the presentations were videoed and placed on the RootsTech web page to view for free.

Except for one. The one that brought us all laughter and tears. The one we all were looking forward to watching again. To relive an amazing moment. To experience and share with others the moving words and emotion from LeVar Burton as he spoke about his mother, family stories, and his participation in Alex Haley's Roots.
It was Friday morning and LeVar was to kick off the first ever African Heritage Day held at this conference.
He had us laughing, crying and then sobbing as he was gifted with his family history courtesy of FamilySearch. We blogged about it, came home and told our family and friends how wonderful it was and recommended it as one to watch. But, sadly it wasn't available.

And now? Issues that held it back before have now been resolved and 7 months later the video is up and available to everyone!


Click above to watch

So go grab some tissues, get comfortable in your favorite chair and click on the photo above to watch.
Then, to get the rest of the story, watch the youtube video below. This news clip shares the emotions felt as LeVar was shown unknown information on some of his ancestors.



 You won't be the same afterward.

Thanks so much for stopping by.
Helping you climb your family tree,



Sunday, September 3, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

September 3-September 9




Sept. 4~
 Philip Roberts, III (1798-1852), my 4th great grandfather died 165 years ago in Columbia, Richland, South Carolina. He is buried in St. Westbury High Hill Cemetery in Richland County.
    

Headstone of Philip Roberts
St. Westbury High Hill Cemetery
Richland County, South Carolina
Sept. 9 ~
      Thomas J. McRady (1821-1896), my maternal 3rd great grandfather was born 196 years ago in South Carolina. He lived many years in the Sumter County area and may have been born in the area.

Thomas J. McRady
Headstone
Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery
Pisgah Crossroads, Sumter, South Carolina
Who are you remembering this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by! 
Helping you climb your family tree,




Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.


My Happy Dance This Week:  
Not a big reason to celebrate this week just plugging along with some client work and a few upcoming projects. Happy Dance moments don't come around every week, so when they do it's a great reason to celebrate! Hope you had some moments to dance about this week!


                                                                                     
                                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


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Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,