When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Thursday, April 27, 2017

In-Brief With IDG~Pennsylvania Genealogy-Review

Disclaimer:
Reviewing new genealogy products is something I am asked to do occasionally. For this review, a .pdf copy was sent for free.
No other compensation will be given. 
Opinions expressed are my own.



A new In-Brief Guide "Pennsylvania Genealogy" has been added to the growing list of available titles in the In-Brief with IDG series from The In-Depth Genealogist.

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL is the author of this guide for those researching roots in the state of Pennsylvania.
What is an In-Brief Guide? An easy to take along 4-page laminated "cheat sheet" to help understand what is available for a topic or state to get you on your way to finding your ancestors.

This new publication begins with an overview of Pennsylvania including interesting facts and a timeline.
Very helpful are the research strategies explaining what types of records are available and where to find them. For those whose ancestors migrated to other locations from Pennsylvania an explanation of migration routes is included. 
The brickwall buster information is sure to come in handy with those problem ancestors. 
From where to find vital records to understanding Pennsylvania Laws, the guide has many links in various categories to help you find the records you are looking for. Also included is a list of books and manuscripts for using in researching the state.

Methods of research and the types of records available differ depending on location. Before beginning in a new area or when needing suggestions to work through a problem, learning the where, what and how in the locality can help us be successful.

Do you have Pennsylvania ancestors? Whether you have researched there for years or are just beginning, I would recommend In Brief with IDG  "Pennsylvania Genealogy".

Thanks for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, April 23, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

April 23-April 29



April 28~
 Gilbert Ernest Roberts, Jr. (1944-1999), my maternal Uncle died 18 years ago on this day. He is buried in Quaker Cemetery in Camden, Kershaw, South Carolina.

Gil Roberts, Jr.
1962
©Cheri Hudson Passey




Arthur Wellington Baker (1857-1940), my paternal Great Great Grandfather, was born on this day 160 years ago. He was born in Sumter County, South Carolina and was the son of Alpheus J. Baker (1824-1917) and Mary Ellen (Jones) Baker (1826-1865).


Arthur Wellington Baker
(1857-1940)

 My maternal Great Grandmother, Beulah Mae (Price) Roberts (1897-1980) would have been celebrating her 120th birthday on this day. Beulah was born in Bath, Aiken, South Carolina. She was the daughter of Bertrand Campbell Price (1876-after 1922) and Bessie Mae (Eargle) Price (1878-1943).


Beulah Mae (Price) Roberts
(1897-1980)
57th Birthday-1954
©Cheri Hudson Passey

Interesting how events coincide with one another. Not only did these three happen on one day, but Gil Roberts died on his grandmother Beulah Mae Robert's birthday.

Who are you remembering this week?
Thanks for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.



                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week:
 Teaching two classes of newbies had me jumping for joy! I absolutely love getting people started on their genealogy journey or helping them continue on their way. Can't wait for my next class!


                                                                                           Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!





Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Friday, April 21, 2017

NGS 2017 In Raleigh~Come See Me!


If you have ever attended a National Genealogy Society Conference, you know what an amazing learning experience it is!



This year, Findmypast.com is offering to get you connected with expert genealogists at its booth #315 in the Expo Hall.
All you have to do is sign up for a free consultation and choose a topic! How simple and fun is that! 
For more information check out the Findmypast blog.
I am pleased to announce that I will be one of the genealogists who will be helping with this awesome experience.
So, if you are going to NGS2017, request a time for a consultation and come see me! 
What can I help you with? 
We can talk about getting started on your journey, brick walls, U.S. research, etc. 
Just fill out the form, and tell 'em Cheri sent you! 
See you in Raleigh!

Helping you climb your family tree,
Cheri




Sunday, April 9, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week:
 My local genealogy club had a workshop yesterday. After much planning and long hours putting together my presentation, it all went off without a hitch....well except for a couple of problems with the internet connection. Other that we had a great day of learning and sharing. It's always great to hang out with genfriends!

                                                                                           Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!






Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Tuesday's Tip~Gettin' By With Help From Our Friends-Emily Hackett-Fiske!


Today's Tuesday Tip comes from Emily Hackett-Fiske, owner of and blogger at A Link to Your Past.


­­Tips for Navigating AncestryDNA results

Many times our excitement (think kid in a candy store) takes over when thinking about the possibilities of combing genetic and traditional research, but we often need to take a step back and not miss the obvious.  I am writing these tips to help not just the genetic genealogist, but for anyone and everyone who takes a DNA test.  Though the tips in this blog post are using AncestryDNA results for examples, these tips can be applied to the other DNA testing companies as well.

       1.    Family Tree – Link It!

Everyone should have a “basic” family tree linked to his or her DNA results at a minimum.  There is nothing more frustrating than seeing “No family tree” as seen in the image below.  If you have tested and have not included a family tree, I am speaking to you!  Everyone takes DNA test for different reasons, but why not take advantage of the features available.  Now there are a few instances, such as adoptees, who may not have a “paper” family tree to link.  

You do not need a subscription with Ancestry to link a family tree to your results.  The option for nonsubscribers is to create a free, public family tree, and link to your results under the AncestryDNA settings.  Worried about privacy?  There is the option to make people “living” for the first couple of generations even when they are deceased.  A more advanced researcher most likely will determine the connection even with the simplest clues, while a more beginner researcher user may begin to recognize surnames or locations. 

If you are a subscriber, there is the option to make your family tree private (lock symbol as seen below for my linked family tree).  You could also create a “genetic” family tree to link, where you are providing much less information than your “paper” family tree.  Once again, there may be enough clues for the advanced researcher to identify the connection and the beginning stages for the beginner researcher. 

This was the case with the first of the 3rd cousin level matches shown below.  Based on the public family tree linked to the match’s results, I was able to correlate a spouse’s surname and make the connection.  This was significant for the match as he knew nothing about his grandmother’s family, and it confirmed most likely the half-sibling relationship between my great-grandmother and his grandmother.  We need to be building and linking these family trees for everyone to have a better experience with genetic genealogy.







2.  Shared Ancestor Hint  - Check it!

Recently, a DNA match on AncestryDNA.com contacted me because she was interested in our Shared Ancestor Hint, but was unable to see the connection due to my private tree setting. Prior to returning a message, I reviewed the hint and the username information.  How did I connect to someone from Australia and why was my gut telling me something seemed off with the hint?  





Thank goodness for private tree setting!  This prevented wrong information from being distributed to a public family tree.  Stopped one shaky leaf hint replication error!  As you can see above in the image, Ancestry provided a “hint” to our DNA connection.  Does your gut tell you anything is wrong? 

According to this hint, Susannah Ware was the mother to Joseph Casborn/Casborne and Joseph Parker.  There is always the possibility she was married twice.  However in this case, Casborn is not a common surname in Rhode Island during the time period, and I had spent time researching this family, eventually making my way back to England.  My balloon of excitement was deflated very quickly when I realized the error! 

The first image below is Joseph Casborn, who is the son of Susannah WARE, however, take a good look at the second image below.  Joseph Parker is not the son of Susannah Ware, but of Susan WARDE.  Always check Ancestry’s Shared Ancestor Hint for accuracy!  






    3.  Last Logged In Date – Review It!


The “Last logged in” date can be somewhat telling about how interested someone might be about connecting with DNA matches.  The image below shows when various matches have logged into their accounts to view their DNA results/matches.  There are matches that log in every day, while some haven’t logged in to accounts for over a year.  I know it is hard to believe someone not wanting to log in every day, but it can be overwhelming when you are uncertain about what to do with these DNA results. 


         4.  Family Units – Build It!

Many times various members of a family will test, however, each person administrates their own DNA results instead of one person administrating the family. It is beneficial to determine the family units from shared matches and clues left by the users.  Once the family unit has been determined, find the person of the group that has been logging in the most (going back to Tip No. 3) and contact that person. 

Recently, I came across two situations, where the family members all tested separately.  In one case, the family member with the closest match to my client had passed away only months earlier, which I would have not known without contacting the other family member that logged in the most.  In the other case, the family member with the closest match to my client was older and not computer savvy, which I only determined by contacting the family member that logged in the most. 

        5.   GedMatch.com – Upload Today!

If you have not uploaded your DNA results to GedMatch, PLEASE consider doing it.  There are many blog post on what Gedmatch is, how to upload and the features.  It is hard to believe that not everyone is running out and testing at all four companies, but they aren’t.  Gedmatch is a great (FREE) website, where anyone from the “big three” testing companies can upload the DNA results and compare with others who have tested at other companies.  There are also some great tools as well! 




Emily Hazel Hackett-Fiske is owner of A Link To Your Past, a genealogical research company specializing in unknown parentage and DNA.  Emily also provides services in Vermont and New Hampshire genealogical research.    Genealogical research has been her passion in life since she can remember.  It is the thrill of the chase and discovery for those complex genealogical problems that keeps Emily’s passion burning.  It is her desire to share and support others in their journey in discovering their family, both past and present, where genetic and paper family trees meet.







Wow! Emily! Thanks so much for the great DNA tips!
They will help me and many others as we try to connect with family.

We'd love to hear your thoughts on Emily's tips and how using DNA has helped you in your family history research.
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,



Sunday, April 2, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week:
 After a few extensions due to family emergencies, I finally completed the American Genealogy Home Study Class from the National Genealogy Society!  Getting my certificate of completion in the mail had me dancing for joy! 


NGS American Genealogy Homestudy
Certificate of Completion


                                                                                           Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!






Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Friday, March 31, 2017

Friday's Faces from the Past~What is She Wearing?

A polaroid picture of my maternal grandmother, Mary (Baker) Hudson (1920-2010) shows her standing by an advertisement for Allied Investment County of Columbia, South Carolina.
From the background, it looks as if it could have been at some type of exhibit hall.
I am not sure if she is wearing a typical suit from the time period or some type of uniform. 
She was a homemaker and did not work outside the home.
What do y'all think? It was most likely taken in the 1950s.

Mary (Baker) Hudson
1950s
Columbia, South Carolina

©Cheri Hudson Passey
Does this type of outfit look familiar to you? Can you tell me what my grandmother is wearing or why this picture may have been taken?
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Thursday, March 30, 2017

Using PERSI-An Interview with Jen Baldwin



During RootsTech 2017 I was pleased to be able to interview Jen Baldwin from FindMyPast.com and talk to her about PERSI (Periodical Source Index) which is now available on their site.
Jen talked about PERSI's past and future as well as the benefits for users and publishers. 

Jen Baldwin
Data Aquisition Manager, North America
Findmypast.com


PERSI has been a wealth of genealogy information for many years. This subject index of genealogy and local history periodicals is maintained at the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
For years the Library has been collecting materials from local, state and regional genealogy and historical societies. Articles are indexed into a searchable database.
Until recently, utilizing the vast collection meant a trip to the library or searching the index via Heritage Quest Online then submitting a form to request a copy of an article. 
Although you may still visit the ACPL, Heritage Quest Online is no longer partnered with PERSI.

Today, thanks to Findmypast.com, PERSI is being updated, digitized and made available to search and view online. Currently, there are tens of thousands of articles available with more added every quarter. For those that have not yet been digitized the index leads to a form to send for a copy of the article from the ACPL. 
For Findmypast to film this vast resource, permission needs to be obtained from the publishers of the materials to avoid violating copyright. By agreeing to allow Findmypast to digitize and publish their periodicals each receives a copy of the images and royalties. A win/win for societies and the public.
It is important to know searching the PERSI database is free. A membership to Findmypast is only required to view a digitized record.
There are free ways to access the images. 
Your local LDS Family History Center and many local libraries have findmypast.com available for free. 
If these options are not in your area, take advantage of Findmypast's free trials and free weekends throughout the year.

How do you find PERSI on Findmypast? There are two places. 
The first is from the search drop-down list on the main page. 
Click on Search, Newspapers, and Periodicals and then PERSI.


New PERSI Landing Page
Search Button

For a better search experience use the new PERSI search landing page at http://www.findmypast.com/persi
This leads you to the search button at the top right and links to tutorials on how to use the resource below.

New PERSI Landing Page
Tutorial Links
Findmypasts.com

New PERSI Search Box
Findmypast.com
PERSI Search Results Screen
Findmypast.com

What can you find using PERSI?
-How to articles
-Record transcriptions
-Family Histories
-Social Histories
-Local Histories
-Obituaries
-Military service
-Occupation information
-Family stories
-Church records
The list goes on and on. Think about the newsletters and periodicals you have seen from the areas your ancestors lived. The articles contain various topics about the area and people who lived there. Imagine being able to search them all, from everywhere your people lived. 
A bonus is getting a hit on an article you never thought of searching! Descendants may have written articles about your ancestors and placed them in their local publications.
Without PERSI, you may never have known they existed.

Here is an example of what you may find. 
A search of South Carolina records with images produced several results including this 1906 issue of The Confederate Veteran.
The column is called "The Last Roll" and contains obituaries of Confederate veterans and their widows. Many are long and include interesting details of the person's life. Photos are often included.

Confederate Veteran
Spring 1909, pg. 128
PERSI
findmypast.com

Confederate Veteran
Spring 1909, pg. 129
PERSI
findmypast.com

Imagine if one of these was your ancestor. What would it help you learn about them?

Thanks, Jen, for talking to us about this incredible source!

Take some time to go through the tutorials to get acquainted with the best practices for searching the PERSI database. The tips and tricks will help you locate information on your family that you may not be able to find anywhere else.
And who knows, perhaps break down a brick wall! 
Let me know what you find!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,



Monday, March 27, 2017

Mailbox Monday~Letters From Mattie-Part 5

Mattie Baker with grandson John
About 1947

This series of letters are transcribed from those written by my great great grandmother, Martha "Mattie" Victoria (Bradford) Baker (1862-1947) in 1925. The letters were sent to her daughter Kathryn "Kate" Louise (Baker) Ryan (1898-1987) while she was living in North Carolina.
Transcription is as written with no correction of spelling or grammatical errors.

       1
Sun pm                                                       
Mattie Baker Letter pg.1
©Cheri Hudson Passey

 well here come a few
lines from your old Maw
to thank you for the
beautiful dress and card
and words fail to tell
just how much I appreci
ate them and love the
ones that sent them and
best of all is just to know
that you all was thinking
of old Mother at home on
that day you don't know
how good it made me feel
although it brought tears
to my eyes. well I must 
tell you what all I got first

            


                 2                                                                 
Mattie Baker Letter pg. 2
©Cheri Hudson Passey

your Pa gave me a ten
dollar bill Annie n[?}ery
vest and stockings Ruth
sent me a pretty voil 
dress Geo a sent a pair
of silk stockings and Bess
sent me a nice hand bag
and 2 dollar and a half
gold piece I hope I will
soon have another birthday
Geo a is still at Ruth's I
wrote and told her to send
him home but he has not
got here yet I want to see
him so bad if she don't
think I will have to go up there

                  

             
                 

                  
            

                      3
why don't I know that he is                                    
Mattie Baker Letter pg. 3
©Cheri Hudson Passey

taken good care of I want
him home, we had another
death in the family Frid-
day poor old Man Nunnery
passed out the old fellow
was bad off for nearly 3 
weeks. Bess and Tom was
home last Sun. and Ellie
looks better than she has
in a long time how is Didy
and Thelma love them
both for me don't you think
it is about time you all was
coming home lI think so
well  as I don't know any news
I will bring this scratching to
a close as I want to write Bess
Ruth and Geo A so you all
be good by by with a heart full

              
                 4                                                             
Mattie Baker Letter pg. 4
©Cheri Hudson Passey

of love from Mother

PS
I have not tried on my 
dress get but I know it will
fit. my chickens and garden
is getting on better since
it rained for it has been
so hot and dry down here
as ever Mother















Mattie's birthday was June 11, so this letter was written after that date, thanking her children for the birthday presents she recieved from them. She references an "Old Man Nunnery" dying.
Sometime after 1920, the Baker family were involved with the county poorhouse. Arthur Baker was recorded on the 1930 census as being the superintendent.
A search of death certificates for a Nunnery in 1925 in Sumter County reveals a Joe Nunnery who was a pauper and died 12 June 1925. This may be the man she was speaking of. 

Once again, Mattie writes to her daughter Kate about her week, the love she feels for her family and her desire to have them together. She also shares as she has in previous letters the feeling of family they shared with those they served in the poorhouse.


Mentioned in this letter~
Paw-Arthur Wellington Baker (1857-1940)
Children-
Annie-Annie Dargan (Baker) Parish (1895-1929)
Bess- also called Ellie in the letter-Ella Fair (Baker) Wells (1889-1971) and her husband Tom-John Thomas Wells (1891-1955)
Ruth-Emma Ruth (Baker) Early -(1901-1993)
Geo A- George Albertus Baker, Sr.(1880-1940)
Grandchildren-
Geo A-George Alburtus Baker, Jr. (1910-1949)
Thelma Marian (Baker) Hendry (1907-1936)

Didy-unknown who she is referring to by that name in her letters.

Mattie's letters to daughter Kate
©Cheri Hudson Passey


Did you miss reading Mattie's other letters? You can find them by clicking on these links:
Letter 1
Letter 2
Letter 3
Letter 4


Letters from our ancestors can tell us so much about them and their lives. We learn their personalities and learn about good times and bad.
Do you have letters from your ancestors? I would love to hear about them!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree, 


Sunday, March 26, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

March 26-April 1



March 30~
   My maternal step-grandfather, Francis "Frank" Emerson Sullivan, Jr. (1923-2004), was born 94 years ago on this day. Frank was the first and only child of Francis Emerson Sullivan, Sr. (1880-1925) and Mary Christine (Williams) Sullivan. (1896-1930). 
He was born at Camp Jackson, Richland, South Carolina. 

Frank Sullivan
©Cheri Hudson Passey

Are we kin? Please contact me. Together we can find our people.
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,





Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week: It's always a Happy Dance moment when adding a new family to my tree. This week I was able to find information on descendants of one of my great uncles. 
Originally the story was told his daughter died young and had no children. Now, I find this untrue and there are cousins I need to find! 

                                                                                           Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!



http://ctt.ec/bag8G

Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Friday, March 24, 2017

Friday's Faces From the Past~Do You Know This Soldier?


Fellow researcher, Keith Edwards posted this picture on a South Carolina Facebook page in hopes of identifying him.
The young man in this picture is described as being a member of the 10th South Carolina Infantry serving in the Civil War as a Confederate Soldier. 
His name is unknown but it is believed he was from the Low Country area of South Carolina. 
Williamsburg, Georgetown, Horry or Marion County may have been his home.



Unknown Confederate Civil War Soldier
10th South Carolina Infantry

Do you know this soldier? Let's get this picture back home!



Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Tuesday's Tip~Getting' By With Help From Our Friends.


This edition of Tuesday's Tip comes from Sue McNelly of the Kindredpast blog.


Using Social History resources to expand the ‘dash’ between the dates.
Placing our ancestors in their social, historical and cultural environment can help us learn more about them and the events that may have affected their lives and the decisions they made.   There is so much more to our ancestors than their birth date and death date.  The dash between those dates represents a life and one which we can find out more about using social history resources.
Here are some of my favorite social history resources:
·       Journals and Diaries:  Not all of us are lucky enough to have an ancestor who left a journal or diary for us.  Fortunately, many of our ancestors’ contemporaries kept journals which we can use to add to our understanding of their daily lives.   Here are a few helpful sites. There are many more available online.
  • Newspapers:  While we all want to find our own ancestor’s name in the paper, just reading newspapers from the time period that your ancestor lived in, and in the particular place they lived, allow us a glimpse into what was happening around them.  Some of the sites that I have found success with:
  • The Library of Congress- Social History Resources:  There is so much to explore on the Library of Congress site.  Efforts to use social history in our research is enhanced by photos, audio recordings, film, maps, newspapers, books, drawings, poetry, and manuscripts, all available here.  Looking for information on the everyday life of migrant families living in camps during the Dust Bowl period of American history, it can be found here.   Looking for photographs of Louisiana architecture including abandoned plantations and other historic buildings, the Library of Congress has those.   The collection is vast and you can easily spend hours on this site.

·       FamilySearch Wiki: Not only does the Wiki direct you to where genealogical records are but put in a locality and it will give you the history, show you maps and migration routes, direct you on how to research in that locality, show you historical resources available like county histories and journal articles.  This is a greatly underused resource.

·       A Vision of Britain Through Time:  For those of us researching in the U.K. this is an excellent site for finding historical maps.  They also have a large collection of British travel writing which is searchable by town name to see what may have been written about the town or city your ancestor lived in.
These are only a few of the many (many!) resources available to us to aid in fleshing out our ancestors and learning more about the events surrounding them and how they may have been influenced by them. 



Sue’s Bio:

Sue has been researching her family history for about 15 years. Born in South Africa to her British father and South African mother, Sue’s roots are predominantly English with a little Scottish, Irish and of course South African, to add to the mix. Sue is currently the Membership Chair for the International Society of British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH) and is working towards professional certification. Sue can be found on twitter at @KindredPast and blogging at kindredpast.com.
  
Thank you for these great tips, Sue!


Social History is an important avenue for learning and understanding our ancestors.
Do you research the social and historical history of your ancestors? What tips do you have? I'd love to hear from you.
Thanks so much for stopping by!


Helping you climb your family tree,