When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Sunday, August 20, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

August 20-August 26


August 20~
 Martha Jane (Brown) McRady (1821-1894), my maternal 3rd Great Grandmother would be celebrating her 196th birthday on this day. She may have been born in the Sumter County, South Carolina area. 

Martha Jane Brown McRady
Headstone
Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery
Pisgah Crossroads, Sumter, South Carolina
Photo Credit: Remember Me-Findagrave.com
Used with permission

My paternal 3rd Great Grandmother, Matilda C. (?) Martin (1812-1876) was born 205 years ago. She lived in the Iredell County, North Carolina area but it is not known if she was born there. 



Matilda C. Martin
Headstone
Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery
Statesville, Iredell, North Carolina
Photo Credit: Joy Steele-Findagrave.com
Used with permission
  
August 24~
 My maternal Grandfather, Gilbert Ernest Roberts, Sr. (1920-1944) would be 97 years old on this day. He was born in Columbia, Richland, South Carolina to parents William Treadford Roberts (1894-1959) and Beulah Mae (Price) (1897-1980).


Gilbert Ernest Roberts, Sr.
Gilbert Ernest Roberts, Sr.
1943
©Cheri Hudson Passey




Who's on your calendar this week?
Thanks so much for stopping by!


 Helping you climb your family tree,



Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!


You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.


                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week:  There are some amazing records out there that give us information about our family. Whether it's seeing my ancestors mentioned or those of a client, it's always exciting. Looking through records for a new research project, I have smiled this week at a clients' ancestor for trying to convince the U.S. government to repay him for the items Union Soldiers took from him during the Civil War in a denied Southern Claims Commission file and read with interest a Slave Narrative that named not only her owner, the owner's son and the  places she lived on during and after the war. 
There are so many records to search beyond birth, marriage, death, and census.
What did you discover this week that had you dancing?
                                                                                     
      Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Tuesday's Tip~Gettin' By With Help From Our Friends-Dustin Austin


This edition of Tuesday's Tip comes from Ohio genealogist, Dustin Austin.

Dustin's Tips:
1. Follow the money $$$$
No matter if your family was rich, middle class, or poor, there is always a trail to follow! Following the money, no matter how much it was can lead you a wealth of information. Many people have the mindset, that if their family didn’t have any money, it wasn’t worth checking out. In one case I was able to find the birth and death dates for all of the children of my 4x great grandparents. Several of the children were not even listed in the Catholic Church books. There was a little black book that my 4x great grandfather had written notes in, which would be admitted into court during the settlement of his estate. In this book were the birth and death dates of all children including the infant children who died shortly after birth. You will never know what you may find if you look in all places possible! 

2.DNA Matches
So often as I am speaking and talking about DNA, many people say to me “Dustin, my matches never message me back!?. I have found to have great success with getting more matches to respond to me with the way I word my messages. 
Example: 

Dear Cousin,
RE: the test you admin for: R.E.

I see that we are a DNA match, and I would love to help figure out the connection. Based on our shared matches and my research at this point, I believe that we are Austin cousins. Does this surname sound familiar to you? 

Would you mind sharing with me the surnames of R.E.’s great grandparents (if known), and I will try to figure out the connection. 

I look forward to hearing from you soon,

Your Cousin,
Dustin

What you will find is that I am putting it back on myself, and I am willing to do most of the work to figure out the connection. Once people know how you are related, they are more willing to share photos and information. Many people want others to figure out the connection for them, or are too wordy in their messages, and lose their attention before they finish reading. Then they never hear back from that match! So, to round out this tip, make your messages short, to the point, and put the work back on yourself!  

3.Public Ancestry Member Trees
Although sometimes useful, use caution when adding information from Ancestry Public Member Trees. So often people get hooked by those Ancestry commercials and think they can have their family tree “done” within hours. The most import thing to keep in mind is to look at the sources under any specific public tree you are looking at. If their only source is “Ancestry Family Trees” you will want to go check out that source and see which tree the information came from. In most cases, it came from another unsourced and undocumented family tree, and that tree will also be sourced as “Ancestry Family Tree”.  Using them as a guide can help in your research, but verify any information you find in them! 

4.Deed Research
One place you may not think of putting at the top of your research list is those deed records! When someone has real estate, it is typically their most valuable asset. Transferring or mortgaging these assets requires lots of documentation, especially when it comes time to transfer those assets upon their death. That means deeds could leave great information behind. Before you go spending $25-$75 on a death certificate, you may want to check with the county recorder’s office. In several cases, I have found copies of those expensive estate records, death certificates and letters WITH the deed records. When I researched in one county in Michigan, I found they charge $2.00 per page for their probate papers. Some probate offices will not copy sections for you, it's all or nothing.  Well the idea of spending $150 to get one estate packet, did not sit well with me. So I drove down to the recorder’s office and found the estate papers I was looking for there, at a cost of only $6.00. You may save yourself a decent amount of money at the recorder’s office if you look there! 





Dustin Austin is an Ohio native who loves genealogy! His greatest passion is family history research, with his more recent specialty, DNA! You will find Dustin all over northwest Ohio speaking for local groups, organizations, and libraries. He is a banker by day and a genealogist by night. He defiantly knows a thing or two about following the money in any family, which can lead you to valuable pieces of information. He is President of the Seneca County Genealogical Society, A Chapter of The Ohio Genealogical Society, and trustee for the Huron County Chapter Genealogical Society, A Chapter of The Ohio Genealogical Society. He is also active in several other chapters. You will find him “hanging out” in various online Google Hangouts, which he loves to do! He loves spending time at the county offices researching because it’s not all online. He started doing genealogy in 2005 and kicked his research in high gear in 2012, after the passing of his beloved grandfather. He realized the importance of talking with these older people before something happens to them. After a conversation with a cousin at the funeral showing of his grandfather, it finally struck him he simply cannot wait. 

Thanks so much for your tips, Dustin! 

What are your best tips for genealogy research?
We'd love to for you to share them.

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, July 30, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

July 30-August 5




August 1~
 My maternal great great grandmother, Bessie Mae (Eargle) Price (1878-1943) died 74 years ago in Columbia, Richland, South Carolina from heart disease. She was buried in the Graniteville Cemetery, Aiken, South Carolina.


Bessie Mae Eargle Price
Headstone
Graniteville Cemetery, Aiken, South Carolina
©Cheri Hudson Passey
August 5~
 Samuel James Bradford, II (1815-1875), my paternal 3rd great grandfather died 142 years ago in Sumter County, South Carolina. 



Who's on your calendar this week?
Thanks so much for stopping by!


 Helping you climb your family tree,


Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.


                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week: This was a great week for cousin connections! I had several people contact me via online trees and on my facebook business page who are related to me in one way or another. If you are not blogging and posting your tree online, you really need to do so!
                                                                                     
      Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Monday, July 24, 2017

Dog Days of Summer~Did Your Ancestor Own Pets?

Animals have been a part of my family for several generations. 
Some of them are pictured below.
This circa 1912 photo of the Benjamin Thomas Thames (1854-1931) family features their dog sitting in the seat of the car.

Possibly the same family dog is included in the photo of Margaret Frances "Fannie" (Gibson) Thames (1854-1929) and grandson Benjamin Allen Hudson (1918-1976). This picture was taken in about 1920.

My paternal grandmother, Mary (Baker) Hudson (1920-2010) loved cats. I always remember her having one. Seems she started young! 

Later in life, my great grandparents, William Treadwell Roberts (1894-1959) and Beulah Mae (Price) Roberts (1897-1981) lived on a farm outside of Camden, South Carolina. Photos were taken of them and some of their animals.


William and cows.

Beulah, some of her grands and a cow.

Beulah feeding the chickens.












I remember visiting my great aunt, Auntie Kate -Kathryn Louise (Baker) Ryan (1898-1987) and being impressed with the tricks her dog "Jaques" could do.


My mom, Brenda Jean (Roberts) Sullivan with her dog "Sam."
My maternal grandparents Francis "Frank" Emerson Sullivan (1923-2004) and Azile Juanita (Daughrity) Roberts Sullivan (1921-2009) always had dogs and cats. 

"Sam" with them at the beach

Frank with "Patches."

Frank with "Toby."

Azile with "Lady."

Azile enjoyed the visits of therapy dogs in the nursing home.

I grew up with pets too.

Dad, John Allen Hudson, with "Suzie."
"Chum" and Mitzie Lee"
John and "Chum."
My parents are still enjoying their pets.

"Anna" watching John sleep
Just a couple of weeks ago, my husband, children and I welcomed the newest member of the family. Meet Bella Mae. She is a 3-month-old mini chocolate Beagle. 


Did your ancestors own pets? Leave your comment or link to a blog post below. This post was written and added to my August-Dog Days of Summer post on the In-Depth Genealogists Blog. Your responses will be a part of the recap post at the end of the month!


Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, July 16, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar


July 19~
 Margaret Frances "Fanny" (Gibson) Thames (1854-1929), my paternal great great grandmother, died 87 years ago in Clarendon County, South Carolina. Fannie died from stomach cancer and was buried in Home Branch Cemetery in Paxville.

Margaret Frances (Gibson) Thames
Headstone
Home Branch Cemetery
Paxville, Clarendon, South Carolina
©Cheri Hudson Passey

July 22~
 Margaret Ann (Thames) Hudson (1875-1960), my paternal great aunt and step great grandmother, died 57 years ago on her 84th birthday. Annie died in Manning, Clarendon, South Carolina and was buried in the Home Branch Cemetery in Paxville.  Annie was born in Clarendon County, South Carolina and was the daughter of Benjamin Thomas Thames (1854-1931) and Margaret Frances "Fannie" (Gibson) Thames (1854-1929).



Margaret Ann (Thames) Hudson
Headstone
Home Branch Cemetery
Paxville, South Carolina
©Cheri Hudson Passey

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.


                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week: I can't say I really had a Happy Dance moment this week. Most of it was spent organizing and analyzing the things found on my archive trip last week. Although, anytime I can work on my family history is a time to celebrate! 
                                                                                     
      Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Saturday, July 15, 2017

Randy Seaver's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun~Longest Line of Ancestral Tombstones

This week on his blog Genea-Musings, Randy Seaver gives the challenge to determine and share our longest line of ancestral tombstones.

My longest unbroken line is on my paternal side.
1-My grandfather Benjamin Allen Hudson (1918-1976) buried in the Sumter City Cemetery, Sumter, South Carolina.



2-His father, my great grandfather, John McSwain Hudson (1880-1961) buried in Home Branch Cemetery, Paxville, Clarendon, South Carolina.





3-John's mother, my great great grandmother, Sarah Rebecca (Smith) Flemming Hudson (1835-1916) buried in Midway Presbyterian Church Cemetery, New Zion,  Clarendon, South Carolina.

©Cheri Hudson Passey


4-Sarah's mother, my 3rd great grandmother, Martha Julia (Epps) Smith (1808-1854) buried in McElveen Cemetery, Williamsburg County, South Carolina.



And ending with:
5- Martha's mother, my 4th great grandmother, Martha Elvira (Frierson) Epps (1783-1853) buried in Epps Cemetery, Williamsburg County, South Carolina.


Five generations of tombstones on my paternal side.
How many do you have on either of your lines? 

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Sunday, July 9, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.



                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week:  Being able to do some research at two archives this week and attend the South Carolina Genealogical Society Annual Workshop was so much fun!  Locating a new name to add to my family tree had me doing that Happy Dance! You never know what you are going to find in any type of record. This new person was listed in the Court of Common Pleas where he was having a dispute over some money issues. A new lead from an often unused source.  What had you dancing this week?
                                                                                     
      Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, July 2, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week: Getting back into my genealogy routine this week has been so much fun. I was able to connect with a client, and actually, do some of my own research. I also made final preparations for a research trip on the calendar next week. Looking forward to reporting some successes! 
                                                                                     
      Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!



Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Monday, June 19, 2017

Mailbox Monday~Letters from Mattie-Part 6

Mattie Baker

The final letter found in a group written by Martha "Mattie" Victoria (Bradford) Baker (1862-1947) to her daughter Kathryn "Kate" Lousie (Baker) Ryan (1898-1987), was sent to with birthday greetings to Kate and her husband Jimmy.
Mattie mentions on the first page of the letter that she knows "Jimmie's birthday is tomorrow". This would date the letter as being written on Sunday, August 5 since his birthday was August 6.  This letter was not in an envelope but others in the group were postmarked in 1925.  A calendar for years surrounding 1925 show August 5 fell on Sunday in 1923 and 1928.  Daughter Meta who is mentioned died in 1926, making the 1923 date the probable year it was written.

I am not sure if these two pages are from one letter even though they were folded together.
As with the previous letters, all spelling and punctuation are transcribed as written.



1
Sunday p.m.
birthday gift. well here
is hoping that you will
 both live to see many
more. this is for you both
for I know that tomorrow
is Jimmies. Oh, how I do
wish that I had something
nice to send you all
but oh my it is bad to
be poor. but you both
have my best wishes
for that is all I have to
give. I went to church
this a.m. but I felt so
lonely going by myself
  (over)







Oh, I forgot to tell you
that the Cadens old cow
got in my garden and
ate up every thing
that was in it she got
in one night so I am
just a toldlier [?] out of
luck eh. Edward is
still improvin and as
bad as can be sis is still
up as yet nothing doing
well I have told you
so now I will say by by
               Mother
here is a birthday card poor
old Paw bought to send to
you & Jimmy and forgot to
send it so here it is
do let him know that you
got it



2
now even Paw was
able to go with me he  
 Can't walk that far; Meta
cooked dinner for me
she had a real nice little
dinner cooked Annie has
not come Home yet.
said that I could look for
her when I see her coming
but I do hope that she will
soon come home for it is
so lonesome here without
them and oh my how I
do miss Marys dear little
tongue, I got a letter from
Ellie Friday said that she
                


                   
    3

was about to give out
 poor child I do wish that I           
could help her in some way
but I feel like my hands
are tied; your Pa said that
he would let you know
when he could come he had not
been able to go up street since
he got home until yesterday
he got a chance to ride he s
complaining a lot to day
I think that he tryed to walk
to much yesterday, the rest of
us are geting along OK well
as there is no new as far as I know
I will close for this time hope
that you are geting along fine and
your new home. also didy
all send love to you all
and I am the same old Maw.




Mentioned in this letter~
Jimmie, son-in-law-James Patrick Ryan-(1893-1950)
Paw- Husband-Arthur Wellington Baker (1857-1940)
Children-
Annie-Annie Dargan (Baker) Parish (1895-1929)
Ellie in the letter-Ella Fair (Baker) Wells (1889-1971)
Meta-Armeda Edna (Baker) Harris (1887-1926)
Granddaughter -Mary (Baker) Hudson (1920-2010)
Didy-unknown who she is referring to by that name in her letters.
An Edward and sis are written about in this letter, but it is now known at this time who they are or what relation they had to the family.

Did you miss reading Mattie's other letters? You can find them by clicking on these links:
Letter 1
Letter 2
Letter 3
Letter 4
Letter 5


Reading through and transcribing these letters written by my paternal great- great grandmother helped me to understand more about her and the family at this moment in time. 
Mattie had a strong love for her children and grandchildren. She loved traveling to visit them and expressed loneliness when they were away from her.  Looking at photos of her with her family gathered around her takes on new meaning.

Do you have letters from your ancestors? I would love to hear about them!
Thanks so much for stopping by!



Helping you climb your family tree,