When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Monday, March 27, 2017

Mailbox Monday~Letters From Mattie-Part 5

Mattie Baker with grandson John
About 1947

This series of letters are transcribed from those written by my great great grandmother, Martha "Mattie" Victoria (Bradford) Baker (1862-1947) in 1925. The letters were sent to her daughter Kathryn "Kate" Louise (Baker) Ryan (1898-1987) while she was living in North Carolina.
Transcription is as written with no correction of spelling or grammatical errors.

       1
Sun pm                                                       
Mattie Baker Letter pg.1
©Cheri Hudson Passey

 well here come a few
lines from your old Maw
to thank you for the
beautiful dress and card
and words fail to tell
just how much I appreci
ate them and love the
ones that sent them and
best of all is just to know
that you all was thinking
of old Mother at home on
that day you don't know
how good it made me feel
although it brought tears
to my eyes. well I must 
tell you what all I got first

            


                 2                                                                 
Mattie Baker Letter pg. 2
©Cheri Hudson Passey

your Pa gave me a ten
dollar bill Annie n[?}ery
vest and stockings Ruth
sent me a pretty voil 
dress Geo a sent a pair
of silk stockings and Bess
sent me a nice hand bag
and 2 dollar and a half
gold piece I hope I will
soon have another birthday
Geo a is still at Ruth's I
wrote and told her to send
him home but he has not
got here yet I want to see
him so bad if she don't
think I will have to go up there

                  

             
                 

                  
            

                      3
why don't I know that he is                                    
Mattie Baker Letter pg. 3
©Cheri Hudson Passey

taken good care of I want
him home, we had another
death in the family Frid-
day poor old Man Nunnery
passed out the old fellow
was bad off for nearly 3 
weeks. Bess and Tom was
home last Sun. and Ellie
looks better than she has
in a long time how is Didy
and Thelma love them
both for me don't you think
it is about time you all was
coming home lI think so
well  as I don't know any news
I will bring this scratching to
a close as I want to write Bess
Ruth and Geo A so you all
be good by by with a heart full

              
                 4                                                             
Mattie Baker Letter pg. 4
©Cheri Hudson Passey

of love from Mother

PS
I have not tried on my 
dress get but I know it will
fit. my chickens and garden
is getting on better since
it rained for it has been
so hot and dry down here
as ever Mother















Mattie's birthday was June 11, so this letter was written after that date, thanking her children for the birthday presents she recieved from them. She references an "Old Man Nunnery" dying.
Sometime after 1920, the Baker family were involved with the county poorhouse. Arthur Baker was recorded on the 1930 census as being the superintendent.
A search of death certificates for a Nunnery in 1925 in Sumter County reveals a Joe Nunnery who was a pauper and died 12 June 1925. This may be the man she was speaking of. 

Once again, Mattie writes to her daughter Kate about her week, the love she feels for her family and her desire to have them together. She also shares as she has in previous letters the feeling of family they shared with those they served in the poorhouse.


Mentioned in this letter~
Paw-Arthur Wellington Baker (1857-1940)
Children-
Annie-Annie Dargan (Baker) Parish (1895-1929)
Bess- also called Ellie in the letter-Ella Fair (Baker) Wells (1889-1971) and her husband Tom-John Thomas Wells (1891-1955)
Ruth-Emma Ruth (Baker) Early -(1901-1993)
Geo A- George Albertus Baker, Sr.(1880-1940)
Grandchildren-
Geo A-George Alburtus Baker, Jr. (1910-1949)
Thelma Marian (Baker) Hendry (1907-1936)

Didy-unknown who she is referring to by that name in her letters.

Mattie's letters to daughter Kate
©Cheri Hudson Passey


Did you miss reading Mattie's other letters? You can find them by clicking on these links:
Letter 1
Letter 2
Letter 3
Letter 4


Letters from our ancestors can tell us so much about them and their lives. We learn their personalities and learn about good times and bad.
Do you have letters from your ancestors? I would love to hear about them!
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree, 


Sunday, March 26, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

March 26-April 1



March 30~
   My maternal step-grandfather, Francis "Frank" Emerson Sullivan, Jr. (1923-2004), was born 94 years ago on this day. Frank was the first and only child of Francis Emerson Sullivan, Sr. (1880-1925) and Mary Christine (Williams) Sullivan. (1896-1930). 
He was born at Camp Jackson, Richland, South Carolina. 

Frank Sullivan
©Cheri Hudson Passey

Are we kin? Please contact me. Together we can find our people.
Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,





Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week: It's always a Happy Dance moment when adding a new family to my tree. This week I was able to find information on descendants of one of my great uncles. 
Originally the story was told his daughter died young and had no children. Now, I find this untrue and there are cousins I need to find! 

                                                                                           Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!



http://ctt.ec/bag8G

Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Friday, March 24, 2017

Friday's Faces From the Past~Do You Know This Soldier?


Fellow researcher, Keith Edwards posted this picture on a South Carolina Facebook page in hopes of identifying him.
The young man in this picture is described as being a member of the 10th South Carolina Infantry serving in the Civil War as a Confederate Soldier. 
His name is unknown but it is believed he was from the Low Country area of South Carolina. 
Williamsburg, Georgetown, Horry or Marion County may have been his home.



Unknown Confederate Civil War Soldier
10th South Carolina Infantry

Do you know this soldier? Let's get this picture back home!



Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Tuesday's Tip~Getting' By With Help From Our Friends.


This edition of Tuesday's Tip comes from Sue McNelly of the Kindredpast blog.


Using Social History resources to expand the ‘dash’ between the dates.
Placing our ancestors in their social, historical and cultural environment can help us learn more about them and the events that may have affected their lives and the decisions they made.   There is so much more to our ancestors than their birth date and death date.  The dash between those dates represents a life and one which we can find out more about using social history resources.
Here are some of my favorite social history resources:
·       Journals and Diaries:  Not all of us are lucky enough to have an ancestor who left a journal or diary for us.  Fortunately, many of our ancestors’ contemporaries kept journals which we can use to add to our understanding of their daily lives.   Here are a few helpful sites. There are many more available online.
  • Newspapers:  While we all want to find our own ancestor’s name in the paper, just reading newspapers from the time period that your ancestor lived in, and in the particular place they lived, allow us a glimpse into what was happening around them.  Some of the sites that I have found success with:
  • The Library of Congress- Social History Resources:  There is so much to explore on the Library of Congress site.  Efforts to use social history in our research is enhanced by photos, audio recordings, film, maps, newspapers, books, drawings, poetry, and manuscripts, all available here.  Looking for information on the everyday life of migrant families living in camps during the Dust Bowl period of American history, it can be found here.   Looking for photographs of Louisiana architecture including abandoned plantations and other historic buildings, the Library of Congress has those.   The collection is vast and you can easily spend hours on this site.

·       FamilySearch Wiki: Not only does the Wiki direct you to where genealogical records are but put in a locality and it will give you the history, show you maps and migration routes, direct you on how to research in that locality, show you historical resources available like county histories and journal articles.  This is a greatly underused resource.

·       A Vision of Britain Through Time:  For those of us researching in the U.K. this is an excellent site for finding historical maps.  They also have a large collection of British travel writing which is searchable by town name to see what may have been written about the town or city your ancestor lived in.
These are only a few of the many (many!) resources available to us to aid in fleshing out our ancestors and learning more about the events surrounding them and how they may have been influenced by them. 



Sue’s Bio:

Sue has been researching her family history for about 15 years. Born in South Africa to her British father and South African mother, Sue’s roots are predominantly English with a little Scottish, Irish and of course South African, to add to the mix. Sue is currently the Membership Chair for the International Society of British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH) and is working towards professional certification. Sue can be found on twitter at @KindredPast and blogging at kindredpast.com.
  
Thank you for these great tips, Sue!


Social History is an important avenue for learning and understanding our ancestors.
Do you research the social and historical history of your ancestors? What tips do you have? I'd love to hear from you.
Thanks so much for stopping by!


Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, March 19, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

March 19-March 25



March 19~
    Eliza (Brazell) Roberts (1836-1890), my maternal 3rd great Grandmother, died 127 years ago in Richland County, South Carolina. She was buried in Brown's Chapel Cemetery, Richland County, South Carolina. She died just short of a week before her birthday which is also remembered on this post.


Eliza Brazell Roberts
Headstone
photo credit: Jim Hepler



March 22~

 This day would have been the 123 birthday of my paternal great grandfather, William Treadford Roberts (1894-1959).
 He was the son of George Phillip Roberts (1856-1930) and Hattie (Brazell) Roberts (1870-1927) and was born in Richland County, South Carolina. 


William Treadford Roberts
©Cheri Hudson Passey


March 25~

  My maternal 3rd Great Grandmother, Eliza Altiza (Brazell) Roberts (1836-1890) was born 181 years ago in Richland County, South Carolina. She was the daughter of John Brazell (1794-?) and Martha (Parnold) Brazell (1795-1876). 

         

Are we kin? Please contact me. Together we can find our people.
Thanks so much for stopping by!





Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week: I have been working on a couple of major projects this week for clients and a class through NGS. Both were completed! Whew! Now on to my next project!
What made you dance this week?

                                                                                           Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!




Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!



Thursday, March 16, 2017

Treasure Chest Thursday~Gilbert's Bowl

It's interesting what people will save and what they will throw away.
When my grandmother married my step-grandfather she felt she needed to get rid of many of my grandfather's belongings. 
She even threw away the letters he sent her while serving in the Marines during WWII before his death in 1944. 
She felt she needed to give her all to a new marriage and leave the past behind.
So, it came as a surprise when I learned about a bowl when cleaning out her home in preparation for selling after her death.

Gilbert's Bowl
©Cheri Hudson Passey

Luckily, my mother knew the story behind this simple yellow bowl. Her father, my grandfather would eat from it.
Grandmom would never let my mom or her brother use it for fear of them breaking it.


Gilbert Ernest Roberts (1920-1944)
©Cheri Hudson Passey
Why out of all the things once a part of his life, did she choose to save the bowl? 
It's too late to ask her and she never told me about it the many times I questioned her about my grandfather, his life, and their short marriage. 
Azile and Gilbert
About 1939
©Cheri Hudson Passey
Perhaps a simple bowl kept in the cupboard could provide her with memories in a subtle way. 
Who would ever guess that she was thinking of him and the life they shared as she saw it there.

What do you have that an ancestor once used? 
Have you written the story for generations to come?

I would love to hear from you.
Thanks so much for stopping by!


Helping you climb your family tree.



Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Findmypast-Free Week of Irish Records


Press Release from findmypast:



FINDMYPAST GRANTS FIVE DAYS OF FREE ACCESS TO ALL IRISH RECORDS IN CELEBRATION OF ST PATRICK’S DAY 2017

·         Findmypast makes entire collection of more than 116 million Irish records free for five days
·         All 116 records free from the 13th  to the 17th March 2017


Leading family history website, Findmypast, has just announced that they will be making their entire collection of Irish records free for five days to help budding genealogists uncover their Irish heritage ahead of St Patrick’s Day 2017. 

From today, Monday 13th March, until 11.59pm (GMT) Friday 17th March, all 116 million records within Findmypast’s Irish collection will be completely free to search and explore, providing family historians from around the globe with the opportunity to learn more about the lives of their Irish ancestors.
This includes free access to;
·         Over 10 million Irish Catholic Parish Registers
·         Over 15 million Census, Land & Substitute records including the 1901 and 1911 censuses
·         Over 30 million detailed Court & Prison Records
·         Over 33 million Irish newspaper articles spanning the years 1708 to 1956
·         Over 7.3 million Dog Licences
·         Over 24 million Irish Passenger Lists
·         Over 2.4 million workhouse & poor law records
·         Over1.4 million Irish Quaker records
·         Over 350,000 records from World War 1, the Easter Rising & more
·         Landed Estates Court records featuring details of over 500,000 tenants residing on estates all over Ireland
·         The complete Griffith's Valuation
·         Over 2.3 million Social History & Directory Records, including the most comprehensive online collection of national directories, dating back to 1814
·         Indexes to Irish wills dating from 1270 – 1858
Free Live Webinar
On Thursday March 16th at 4pm GMT, Findmypast will be hosting a free St Patrick’s Day Webinarpresented by Fiona Fitzsimons, the founder and research director of Eneclann, a Trinity College Campus Company. Fiona manages teams of expert researchers to provide Irish and British family history as well as running a successful probate genealogy service. Her talk, entitled, “Secrets to Successful Irish Family Research”, will cover strategies for online research, Irish customs & traditions and collateral records to help “bridge the gaps”.
New Records Available To Search
Thousands of additional records will be added to Findmypast’s extensive Irish collection on Friday 17thMarch. This will include substantial updates to their collection of Irish Society of Friends (Quaker) records, new directories, administrations, family histories, memorial inscriptions and more. Visit the dedicatedFindmypast Friday page to keep up to date with the latest additions.
Learn more at: http://www.findmypast.com/      

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.
Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research. 
In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

 Good luck finding your Irish ancestors!

Thanks for stopping by!



Sunday, March 12, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.



                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week: 
 While researching my maternal Roberts line I discovered a Revolutionary War Pension file for my 5th great grandfather Philip Roberts (1763-1854). Moving to Kentucky from SC after the war, Philip applied for a pension to help with financial difficulties in 1832. In his application, he gave his birth date and place and wrote about his service with General Francis Marion. 
Also included in the file was the proof of marriage to his second wife Sarah (Hall) Daniels Roberts (1785-between 1870-1880) when she applied for a widow's pension after Philip's death. 
Wow! So much information in this record. It even has his signature. 
Can't stop dancing! What did you discover this week?


                                                                                           Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!




Friday, March 10, 2017

Friends of Friends Friday~Winsor, Celia, Sandy and Kia.

Research into the Richbourg family of South Carolina lead to the will of Claudius Richbough.


Will of Claudius Richbourgh
Sumter County, South Carolina Will Books and Estates Index and File Book, 1800-1963 
Will Book, Vol A-Aa, 1800-1822, pg 209-212
Image from Ancestry.com


Claudius Richbourgh
(1715-1788), a planter in the St. Marks Parish area of South Carolina, recorded a will leaving members of the enslaved in his possession to his children. 


The will was copied into a will book in 1820.
This is my transcription of that copy.
Spelling and punctuation as originally written.

 In the name of God Amen.
  I Claudius Richbourgh of Craven County in the province of South Carolina of St. Marks Planter being of perfect health and of perfect mind and memory thanks be to almighty God; and calling to reembrace the mortality of my body and that it is ordained for all men once to die, do make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following, that is to say, first and principally, I recommend my soul into the hands of God beseeching him to forgive me all my sins through the merits of Jesus Christ my blessed redeemer and my body I bequeath to the earth to be buried and the discretion of my executors hereafter named and as touching such goods worldly estate it hath pleased God to bless me with I give bequeath and devise of the same in manner and form following Impremis--It is my will request and order that all my just debts be first of all duly paid and discharged.
Item I give and bequeath to my beloved son Henry Richbourgh one negroe man by name Winsor to him the said Henry Richbourgh his heirs and assigns forever
Item- I give and bequeath to my beloved son James Richbourgh one negroe boy by name {blank space} to the said James Richbourgh his heirs and assigns forever.
Item -I give and bequeath to my beloved son John Richbourgh one negroe girl by name Celia with her issues and increase to him the said John Richbourg his heirs and assigns forever.
Item-I give and bequeath to my beloved son Nathaniel Richbourgh one negroe boy by name Sandy to him the said Nathaniel Richbourgh during his life and after his death to the lawful heirs of his body.
Item -I give and bequeath to my beloved son William Richbourgh one negroe girl by name Kiah with her issue and increase to him the said William Richbourgh his heirs and assigns forever.
Item-I give and bequeath to my beloved daughter Unity Gayle one negroe girl by name Maria with her issue and increase to her the said Unity Gayle during her life and after her decease then to the heirs of her own body forever.
Item-I give and bequeath to my beloved daughter Susannah Richbourgh one negroe girl by name Betsey with her issue and increase to her the said Susannah Richbourgh during her life and after her decease then the heir of her own body forever.
Item-I give and bequeath to my dearly beloved wife Unity Richbourgh all the remainder of my estate of what kind, nature of denomination whatsoever it may be, or to whosesoever it may be found at the time of my decease both real and personal during her life, and my will and pleasure is that my said wife Unity Richbourgh shall have free possession and enjoyment of the same without any molestation or hindrance whatsoever from or by my executors or other children during her life and further that from and after her decease then I give and bequeath all my estate real and personal both whosesoever and what nature or kind so ever that was in her prosession to be equally divided among Henry Richbourgh, James Richbourgh, John Richbourgh, Unity Gayle and Susannah Richbourgh to be equally and impartically shared and divided between them share and share alike to them or to their heirs and assigns forever.
Lastly I nominate constitute and appoint my three sons Henry, James and John Richbourgh executors of this my last will and testament revoking and disannulling all other former will or wills testament or testaments in witness here of I have here unto set my hand and seal the sixteenth day of February in the year of our Lord One Thousand and seven hundred and seventy eight.
signed sealed published and declared by the testator to be his last will and testament in presence of
RG Dennis
Joseph Joyner
Thomas Avery
And further it is my will all that part of my estate that falls to my son Nathaniel Richbourgh and Unity Gayle, that after their deaths it shall return to the heirs of their bodies forever
Signed Claudius Richbough.
A true copy examined per me
Wm Humphrey Clerk of the Court

South Carolina
Clarendon County

 Personally appeared before me Thomas Avery who being duly sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God sayeth that he did see the willing named testator sign seal publish and declare the within testament of writing to be his last will and testament and that he saw Richard G. Dennis and Joseph Hoyner subscribe their names as witnesses with him to the said will sworn this 6th Day of September 1788 before John Ridgill J.P. signed Tho. Avery.



Releasing the names of Winsor, Celia, Sandy and Kiah so they may be remembered and lead their families to them.



This post will be submitted to the Slave Name Roll Project created by Schalene Dagutis. Do you have documents and records that list the names of the enslaved? Please consider contributing to this project. 



Sunday, March 5, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

March 5-March 11



March 6~
       Martha Parnold Brazell (1795-1876), my maternal 4th great grandmother, died 141 years ago in Richland County, South Carolina. She is buried in the Macedonia Baptist Church Cemetery.

Martha Parnold Brazell
Headstone
Old Macedonia Cemetery
Richland, South Carolina


March 8~
    Alice (Cook) Vaughn (1774-1859), my paternal 5th Great Grandmother died 158 years ago in Sumter County, South Carolina. She was buried in the Dargan Family Cemetery, which is now part of private property in the city of Sumter. 


Alice Cook Vaughn
Headstone
Dargan Cemetery
Sumter, South Carolina


March 9~
 My paternal Great Great Grandmother, Sarah Rebecca (Smith) Flemming Hudson (1835-1916) died 101 years ago in New Zion, Clarendon, South Carolina. Sarah died of influenza and was buried in the Midway Presbyterian Church Cemetery also in New Zion, Clarendon, South Carolina.


Sarah Rebecca (Smith) Flemming Hudson
Headstone
Midway Presbyterian Church Cemetery
New Zion, Clarendon, South Carolina



Who's on your Family History Calendar?

Thanks so much for stopping by!







Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!


You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




                                                                 
My Happy Dance This Week:  
 A case of genealogy serendipity gave me chills a few days ago. After a post transcribing an ancestors letter, I asked if readers had any letters from theirs. A friend made recently at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy responded she had letters from an Uncle who had served in the South Pacific during WWII. 
Curious because my grandfather was killed on the Island of Peleliu in 1944, I asked where her uncle had served.
She responded that he also died in the battle of Peleliu.
His death date? Two days after my grandfather's.
Both served in the 1st Marine Division. My grandfather in the 7th Battalion, her uncle in the 5th. 
These battalions fought side by side on this small island. 
She shared a letter which was written to the family after the death of her uncle. It gave some details of the battle that took his life.
His experience on that small island in the South Pacific was most likely similar to the one that caused the death of my grandfather.
Two genealogists meet in a class in Salt Lake and discover they have loved ones killed tragically in one of the most bloody battles in the South Pacific. 
Chills. Genealogy Serendipity.
Weeping with the memory of lives lost too soon.
Dancing in celebration of the ties that bind. 


                                                                                     

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                           Let the dancing commence!






Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!
Thanks so much for stopping by!