When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun from Randy Seaver-The Day Your Grandmother was Born



Mary Ann (Baker) Hudson about 1921
©Cheri Hudson Passey

Every Saturday night, Randy Seaver from the GeneaMusings Blog issues a challenge.
This week he says:

Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1)  What day of the week was your Grandmother born (either one)? Tell us how you found out.

2)  What event was a headline in the newspapers on that date?  Tell us how you found out.

3) What has happened in recorded history on your Grandmother's birth date (day and month)? Tell us how you found out, and list five events.

4)  What famous people have been born on your Grandmother's birth date?  Tell us how you found out, and list five of them.

5)  Put your responses in your own blog post, in a comment on this blog post, or in a status or comment on Facebook.

Here are my answers:


 Mary Ann (Baker) Hudson about a year old.
©Cheri Hudson Passey
1-I choose my paternal grandmother Mary Ann (Baker) Hudson (1920-2010) for this challenge. Mimi as we called her was born on 5 May 1920. Not only did I always remember her birthday as I was growing up, but it is also on her birth and death certificates. I used the calendar tool in my Legacy Family Tree genealogy software to discover she was born on a Wednesday.

Source: The Watchman and Southron (Sumter, South Carolina) 05 May 1920, Wednesday, Page 1.
Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com: accessed 30 June 2018. 

2-The front page of the local paper The Watchman and Southron reported the death of the Crown Princess of Sweden, the rise of teacher's salary at Winthrop College and worries over cotton prices.


3- From the website This Day in History this list was given for the 5th of May:
Lead Story
 1961 The first American in space
American Revolution
1776 Clinton excludes Howe and Harnett from amnesty offer
Automotive
1944 Driving pioneer Bertha Benz dies
Civil War
1864 Grant and Lee clash in the Wilderness forest
Cold War
1955 Allies end occupation of West Germany
Crime
2004 Human remains found in suitcase near Virginia Beach
Disaster
1995 Hail storm surprises Dallas residents
General Interest
1821 Napoleon dies in exile
1862 Battle of Puebla
1945 Six killed in Oregon by Japanese bomb
1981 IRA militant Bobby Sands dies
Hollywood
2002 Spider-Man is first movie to top $100 million in opening weekend
Literary
1816 The Examiner publishes John Keats’ first poem
Music
1979 Peaches and Herb top the pop charts with “Reunited”
Old West
1877 Sitting Bull leads his people into Canada
Presidential
1985 Reagan visits concentration camp and war cemetery
Sports
1904 Cy Young throws perfect game
Vietnam War
1970 U.S. forces capture Snoul, Cambodia
1972 North Vietnamese turn back South Vietnamese relief column
World War I
1919 Italian delegates return to Paris peace conference
World War II
1941 Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie returns to his capital



5-Some famous people born on May 5th-
Country singer Tammy Wynette
  • English Comedian Micheal Pallin
    English Singer Adele
    American Singer Chris Brown
    This information came from the website On This Day.


Then there is the big celebration of Cinco de Mayo! My cousin used to call it Cinco de Mimi!!

What was happening the day your grandmother was born? Take the assignment and see what you can learn!  Write a post and share it here and on Randy's post!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,






Sunday, June 24, 2018

This Week On My Family History Calendar

24 June-30 June






June 28~
  Alpheus J. Baker, my paternal 3rd great grandfather was born 194 years ago in Sumter County, South Carolina. His father was Jesse Hinton Baker (1795-1866). The name of his mother was thought to be Nancy Wilder but that research has been disputed and more needs to be done to determine the correct mother.

Alpheus J. Baker

My great grandparents, William Treadford Roberts and Beulah Mae (Price) Roberts would be celebrating their 104 anniversary on this day. Wiliam was 20 and Bessie Mae 17 when, as family lore says, they snuck away from their homes in Richland County, South Carolina and eloped.


William and Beulah Mae Roberts
Wedding Day
28 June 1914

Who are you remembering this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Celebration Sunday-Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.

My Happy Dance moment this week:
 Many times my happy dance has come from cousins finding me through this blog. This week I was able to reunite with an old family friend of my parents! After looking through a list of blogs to follow, she chose Carolina Girl Genealogy because she has South Carolina ancestors. After reading through some of my posts, she realized I was the daughter of dear friends she had lost contact with.
While visiting South Carolina this past week, we were able to get together, reconnect and talk genealogy.  You just never know who will find you, so if you haven't started, why not? 
You may find cousins and long lost friends. 










What had you dancing this week?
                                                                                 

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!







Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 





Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Tuesday's Tips~Getting By with Help from Our Friends-Diana Elder





 This edition of Tuesday's Tips comes from our friend Diana Elder of Family Locket. Diana shares her tips on creating an objective to help focus our research.

3 Tips to Focus Your Research with an Objective
Have you ever been sucked into the whirlpool of internet record searches and after an hour or two surfaced wondering where you’ve been and what you’ve accomplished?  It is so easy to get distracted by all the goodies that are available online: census records, birth certificates, cemetery records, and so much more.  How can you put some order into your research?  Try formulating an objective and watch your efforts come into focus.
An objective is simply a statement of what you want to accomplish. It can direct your research for an hour of web searching or it can keep you focused on a major project.  An objective will help you feel proactive with your family history efforts and even when you don’t find a record, you will feel successful.
Writing an objective is the first step in keeping a research log. Besides grounding a research log, a research objective can also guide you through a more involved project There are numerous goals we have as family historians and thinking through an objective and writing it down can help us achieve our goals.  Here are some tips to help you fine tune your research.
Tip # 1    Craft your objective with the end in mind
Decide what you really want to accomplish.  What is the end result of your research going to be?  Maybe you’re writing a family history or a blog post.  You could be working on a project for accreditation or certification. Perhaps you’re working on a brick wall research problem. Think carefully about the research project you want to tackle.
 Tip #2    Break up large objectives into smaller pieces
A large objective like writing a four generation report on your family would need to be broken up into several small, doable objectives, such as “Discover the military service of John Smith, born 1774 in Caroline County, Virginia and died 1804 in Green County, Georgia.
In crafting a research objective, consider whether you’d like to identify a person, discover a relationship, or find event information. Once you’ve decided what the focus of the research project will be, create an objective using key identifiers such as the full name, birth, and death dates and places, or marriage information.
After your objective is written, view it from the perspective of someone who doesn’t know your family. Could they perform acceptable research from the details you included? No need to include all background information on the research question in the objective, just the basics.
Tip # 3  Record your objective
What’s the use of crafting a useful objective if you can’t refer to it, again and again, to keep you on track?  Put it at the top of your research log or research notebook page.  Include it in the opening paragraph of your family history or research report.  Type it out and put it on your wall for the book you’re writing. As you’re researching, stick to your objective and resist the temptation to hop websites.      
Creating an objective is the first step in the “Research Like a Pro” process. The next steps are:
– Review your research with new eyes by creating your own timeline analysis.
– Construct a locality guide to direct your research.
– Create a plan to keep your research on track.
– Style source citations, giving your work credibility.
– Set up a research log to organize and track your searches.
– Write a report detailing your findings and ideas for future research.
Interested in knowing more? Check out several more blog posts on the subject at FamilyLocket.com.




Bio

Diana Elder AG® is a professional genealogist, author, and speaker. She is accredited in the Gulf South region of the United States through the International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists (ICAPGen). Diana graduated from Brigham Young University with a degree in Elementary Education and has turned her passion for teaching to educating teens and adults in proven genealogy techniques. Diana is the author of Research Like a Pro: A Genealogists Guide and creator of the “Research Like a Pro” study group. She writes regular articles for FamilyLocket.com, the genealogy website created by her daughter, Nicole Dyer. She presents regularly at genealogy conferences, sharing the methods she uses every day to solve challenging genealogical problems.

Thanks so much, Diana, for your great tips on creating an objective to help us stay focused!



Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,





Sunday, June 17, 2018

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.

My Happy Dance moment this week:

Continuing education is something I feel is very important for every genealogist. From those who are just beginning to the advanced, there are classes to help hone your skills and make you the best researcher you can be. I try to take courses as often as I can. This week my goal was to get into the Virtual Practicum course offered through the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy in the fall. This is an advanced methodology course. Registration was held yesterday. I had been warned the class quickly filled up even though two sessions were being offered. I pre-registered and then waited until the appointed time when I could click on the link to sign up. And huzzah! I got in! Seeing some of the others posts on social media saying they would be in the same class has me has me so excited!  


What had you dancing this week?
                                                                                 

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!

Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 




Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Book Review-Research Like a Pro: A Genealogist's Guide

Disclaimer: A pdf version was provided at no charge for the purpose of this review



New to the genealogy book market is Research Like a Pro: A Genealogist's Guide by Diana Elder, AG with Nicole Dyer.

Based on successful "Research Like a Pro" classes and blog posts, this step by step approach will lead the reader through a research project large or small and can be used by those with all levels of genealogical research experience.

Beginning with an explanation of how to use the book, the following chapters lead the researcher through the process:
Chapter 1-Research Objectives
Chapter 2-Analyze Your Sources
Chapter 3-Locality Research
Chapter 4-Research Planning
Chapter 5-Source Citations
Chapter 6-Research Logs
Chapter 7-Report Writing
Chapter 8-What's Next for the Researcher?





This book is so much more than just a well-written explanation of basic research methodology. After a detail explanation of the methodology introduced in the chapter, a task is given to the reader to help put each into practice. There is an appendix with templates of the forms used in each chapter and real work samples that show "how to" use each technique.

If you are looking for a way to strengthen your research skills and learn to "Research Like a Pro" this is the book for you!


Research Like a Pro: A Genealogist's Guide is available in print or ebook on amazon.com



Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,






Sunday, June 3, 2018

This Week on My Family HIstory Calendar

June 3-June 9





June 4~
  My maternal great great grandfather, William A. McManus
(1854-1914), was born 164 years ago possibly in Sumter County, South Carolina. As of now, his parents are unknown.



June 9~



David Daughrity
Late 1920's
©Cheri Hudson Passey

Manning David Daughrity, Jr. (1889-1931) died 89 years ago in Sumter, Sumter County, South Carolina. David, my maternal great grandfather, died from an illness he had been suffering from for a while. He was buried in The Sumter City Cemetery. 


Who are you remembering this week?



Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,




Celebration Sunday-Genealogy Happy Dance!




You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.

My Happy Dance moment this week:
 Noting big to celebrate this week, just steady progress in my client work and writing. Getting things done before deadlines and checking off some genealogy to-dos done makes for a good week even if nothing out of the ordinary happens!

What had you dancing this week?
                                                                                 

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!



Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 




Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,