When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Sunday, February 24, 2019

This Week On My Family History Calendar

February 24-March 2




February 24~
    Mary (Strother) Dargan (1782-1822), my paternal 5th Great Grandmother was born 247 years ago. Her parents are said to be William Strother (1730-after 1779) and Catherine (Dargan) Strother (1735-?). She lived in Sumter District, South Carolina.






Gil Roberts

March 1~
 My maternal uncle Gilbert Ernest Roberts, Jr. (1944-1999) would be 75 years old on this day.  
Uncle Gil was the son of Gilbert Ernest Roberts. Sr. (1920-1944) and Azile Juanita (Daughrity) Roberts Sullivan (1921-2009).  
He was born in Camden, Kershaw, South Carolina.


Who are you remembering this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.

                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.




My Happy Dance Moment for this week:


Making it safely to Salt Lake City and visiting family and friends for a few days before RootsTech has me dancing this week! 
Can't wait to get this party started!
Will I see you at RootsTech?




What is your happy dance moment for this week?
  


                                                                               

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!






Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 





Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,










Saturday, February 23, 2019

Seven Years! Who Would Have Thought?


My Blogiversary




Seven years ago I began my blogging journey. I remember being afraid to push publish.
Now seven years later I have been able to share family information, share tips, happy dance moments, methodologies, great places to research and so much more!
Thank you for reading.
Thank you for taking the time to leave comments 
and most of all
thank you for the friendships made along the way!
Here's to another seven years!

Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Sunday, February 17, 2019

This Week On My Family History Calendar

February 17- February 23





Louvinia Blanche (Thames) Hudson
(1866-1918)

  February 17~
   Louvinia Blanche (Thames) Hudson (1886-1918), my paternal great-grandmother would be celebrating her 133rd  birthday on this day. Blanche was born in Clarendon County, South Carolina to Benjamin Thomas Thames (1854-1930) and Margaret Francis (Gibson) Thames (1854-1929).

February 20~

My Paternal 3rd great grandmother, Mary Alice (Dargan) Bradford (1825-1875), died 144 years ago in Sumter County, SC.

Who are you remembering this week?


Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,





Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.

                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.




My Happy Dance Moment for this week:
Finished my powerpoint for my presentation at RootsTech!
With only a few days before I leave for Salt Lake City, it's good to have it done and the packing can begin!




What is your happy dance moment for this week?
  


                                                                               

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!






Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 





Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,




Monday, February 11, 2019

Methodology Monday~Resolving Conflicts






You've gathered several documents recording an event in your ancestor's life and as you look at the information provided, you notice there's a problem. 

The data given is not the same.
It may be different dates, places or even names. What do you do then?
The Genealogical Proof Standard number 4 is the Resolution of Conflicts, but how? 




If the analysis of your records show the conflict is minor and can be easily explained, such as differing birth dates in census records, a short sentence about how this is a common problem with these records should suffice. 

But what if you have a major problem?
Differering parents or spouses names, location or date variations, etc. 
How do you resolve the issue and come up with the best possible answer?


To be able to resolve conflicting evidence, you first must notice that you have one.
 Writing in narrative form as you research is a good way to record the data you are finding. As you write it should become clear if things are not adding up.
Once you see that your evidence is not agreeing, each piece needs to be examined to determine which is more likely to be correct.
Look at what you have gathered. Read back over your notes. Analyze to see who created the record and why,  who the informant was, and determine if it was created at the time of the event. Does your information come from an original or a copy that may have errors?
As you work through your conflicting evidence, you may be able to decide which is the most reliable and why.
If you are able to come to a conclusion and are able to resolve your conflict, take the time to write down your findings and what lead you to your conclusion.
This serves two purposes. 
1-A resolution of the conflict allows you to move on with your research
2-By keeping written notes on the process and the conclusion you can revisit your thought process if you ever question it or if someone else does.
It's important to know that some conflicts may not be able to be resolved with the records that are available. Even after exhaustive research, there may not be enough to give a confident answer. If that is the case, write up why you feel it can't be resolved at this time.
Records may become available in the future that will provide the evidence you need.


Headstone of Manning David Daughrity
Sumter City Cemetery
Photo Credit: Cheri Hudson Passey

When I found a problem with the dates on my great grandfather's headstone and other records giving differing death dates, I had to take a step back and look to see if I could resolve the conflict. A death certificate should have been created, but can not be found.
Gathering what I did have- his obituary, funeral home record, and memorial from his funeral were all in agreement with his date of death. 
My conclusion? The headstone is incorrect. Why? 
The obituary would not have been run BEFORE a death the funeral home wouldn't record a death previous to the event. 
The date given to the creator of the stone was either written incorrectly or misread.
Easy to do. He died on the 9th and they carved 19.

The proof statement of my analysis and findings is included in my notes about him. 
Often, I receive queries as to why I have his death date on my family "wrong" as his stone clearly shows a date ten days later. 
I simply copy my paragraph explaining the conflict resolution and send it.

When faced with conflicting evidence remember to:
Gather your evidence
Cite and analyze your sources
Write as you go
Recognize Conflicts
Examine each piece of conflicting information
Determine which is more reliable and why
Come to a resolution of the conflict if possible

Have you discovered conflicting evidence in your family tree?
Were you able to resolve it? Let us know how!


Thanks so much for stopping by!


Helping you climb your family tree,







Sunday, February 10, 2019

This Week On My Family History Calendar

February 10-February 17



Benjamin Allen Hudson
(1918-1976) 


      February 14~
   My paternal grandfather, Benjamin Allen Hudson (1918-1976) died 43 years ago in Lake City, Florence, South Carolina. 
He is buried in the Sumter City Cemetery, Sumter, South Carolina.
Miss you Pop!









Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.

                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.



My Happy Dance Moment for this week:

This week while researching in The Southern Claims Commission records, I found a statement from an applicant stating the relationship of a witness.
He named him as his son in law! Why was this important? 
I had been trying to find a connection between these two families!
Now I am one step closer to finding the parents of my step grandfather's grandmother!
Happy Dance!


What is your happy dance moment for this week?
  

                                                                               

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!





Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 





Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,






Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Tuesday's Tips-Lisa Gorrell, CG~Preparing for Certification



This time we hear from friend Lisa Gorrell who just received her Certified Genealogist credential.Lisa shares some of her tips for those thinking about starting the process and those already "on the clock". Lisa blogs at "My Trails to the Past" and  “Mam-ma’s Southern Family


I have been recently certified by the Board for Certification of Genealogists® 1  I took eighteen months to work on my portfolio. I had done no work previously before going “on the clock.”
Have you been thinking about becoming certified? Here are some tips.

Tip No. 1.  Get educated! 
It has been determined that many of the candidates that pass the certification process have something in common: They completed the ProGen Study Group  At the time I took the course, it was 18 months, but now it is 12 months long. The group meets once a month and study chapters from the book Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards, edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills. They do homework and members critique each other’s work. It was the best learning experience I had.

Other education where you can learn advanced methodology includes genealogy institutes.
These are a week-long course on a single subject. Some examples of institutes include:
Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG)
Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIPitt)
Institute of Genealogy & Historical Research (IGHR)
Genealogical Institute on Federal Records (Gen-Fed)

I have attended all of these institutes except Gen-Fed. I find that these 5-day courses delve deeper into the subjects and I learn a lot from both the instructors and the fellow students. Of course, I’m also an education junkie.


Tip No. 2.  Figure out whether you are ready for certification.
How do you know if you are ready to work on certification? Perhaps you have been researching your own family for years. Or you attend local genealogy society meetings. Or you have attended many online webinars. See if you can honestly answer some of these questions:
Do you regularly research in probate, deeds, tax, and court records?
Have you done off-line research in courthouses, archives, libraries, and historical societies?
Do you read (and study) the articles in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly?
Have you solved difficult research problems dealing with identity or parentage?
Do you write up your research?
Have you done research for others and written research reports?
Do you follow the Genealogy Proof Standard (GPS)?

Be honest with yourself. Figure out your weak areas and then focus on building the skills in those areas. Take on research for someone else whose ancestors come from a place you are unfamiliar with. That will challenge you beyond your comfort level. It might also reveal your weak areas. That’s good—it gives you something to work towards. Use the BCG website to focus on the key areas where to build your skills. See: https://bcgcertification.org/learning/skills/


Tip No. 3.  Follow the instructions and mind the rubrics.
When working on your portfolio, the most important thing to do is follow all of the instructions. The worst thing that can happen is to leave out steps or to submit the wrong kind of document than what was asked for. You have a rubrics explaining exactly what the judges will be using to review your documents. Use the rubrics to “judge” your own work before submitting.

The application process can be found on the BCG website and there are no secrets. Everything you need to know in order to create a portfolio can be found on their site.
See: https://bcgcertification.org/process/.
I printed out the rubrics and instructions and had them at my desk throughout the entire time I was writing. You must submit your work that has not been reviewed by another person. They want to see how you work as a genealogist.

Bonus Tip: You do not have to perfect.
For each rubric element, you are judged either “Meets Standards,” “Partially Meets Standards,” or “Does Not Meet Standards.” Many portfolios that passed have had some “Partially Meets Standards” marked. The judges look also to see if these elements are remedial. Can the candidate improve with more education and practice?  I have several areas where I will need to improve and will be able to show them when I submit my renewal in five years.

For more about how I became certified, see “Becoming a Certified Genealogist.”





Biography

Lisa S. Gorrell, a Certified Genealogist®, has been seriously researching her family for more than twenty-five years.  It was the birth of her daughters that began the journey connecting the past and the future generations.  One trip to Sutro Library to use microfilm of the 1920 census and finding her grandfather’s family got her hooked. 

She is currently on the board of directors with the Contra Costa Historical Society as recording secretary & volunteers at their archives at the History Center in Martinez. She is also a past-president of the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society and past-recording secretary of the California Genealogical Society.  She is the tour leader with CGS’s research trip to Salt Lake City.

She enjoys giving genealogy presentations and writing about her family on two blogs: “Mam-ma’s Southern Family” and “My Trails into the Past”. She has also written a three-generation family history about her husband’s Swedish ancestors.

Lisa, thank you so much for all your tips on becoming a certified genealogist!
Congratulations on your recent certification!




What about you? Are you thinking about certification? What are you doing to prepare?
We'd love to hear from you!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,







1 The words Certified Genealogist and designation CG are registered certification marks with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, and the designations Certified Genealogical Lecturer and CGL are service marks of BCG, used under license by certificants after periodic competency evaluations (and only during the current five-year period for which they are certified).

Sunday, February 3, 2019

This Week on My Family History Calendar

February 3-February 9





February 9~
 Catherine Ann (Singleton) Dargan (1729-1808), my paternal 6th great grandmother, was born 290 years ago in Virginia.
She was the daughter of Robert and Alice Singleton.

Who are you remembering this week?




Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,









Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!



You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.

                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. 

Share by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section or you may also put a link to a blog post telling about what had you dancing this week.



My Happy Dance Moment for this week:




Every month Legacy Family Tree Webinars posts a list of their Top 10 Webinars for the previous month with an additional 10 runner-ups.
What a shock when I discovered the first 3 in my series Getting Started in Family History were included in the runner up list! Very unexpected! If you are one of those who watched, thank you very much! If you haven't seen the list or my webinars, here's the link.

Still in shock and still dancing!


What is your happy dance moment for this week?
  

                                                                               

                                                                                              Share your discovery!
                                                                                  
                                                                                         Let the dancing commence!





Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 





Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,